Five great summer reads

  • An Italian teen attempts to assimilate into 1990s Los Angeles in the sensual coming-of-age novel “Things That Happened Before The Earthquake” by Chiara Barzini. Cultural nuance meets suburban sexual awakening, with Reebok Pumps.

    An Italian teen attempts to assimilate into 1990s L.a in the sensual coming-of-age unique “Points That Occurred Before The Earthquake” by Chiara Barzini. Social nuance fulfills suv sex-related awakening, with Reebok Pumps.

  • Criminals have their minds erased and are relocated to the Texas Panhandle in Adam Sternbergh’s genre-bending third novel, “The Blinds.” A sci-fi premise and Western-noir flourishes make this whodunit one of summer’s heartiest beach reads.

    Crooks have their minds removed and also are transferred to the Texas Panhandle in Adam Sternbergh’s genre-bending third novel, “The Blinds.” A sci-fi property and also Western-noir flourishes make this whodunit one of summer season’s heartiest beach reviews.

  • In “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America,” economic policy expert Richard Rothstein dives into a comprehensive history of the federal, state and local laws that shaped discriminatory housing patterns between races that still exist today.

    In “The Shade of Law: A Forgotten History of Just how Our Federal government Segregated The U.S.A.,” economic plan expert Richard Rothstein dives into a comprehensive background of the federal, state as well as regional laws that shaped discriminatory real estate patterns between races that still exist today.

  • Washington Post reporter Monica Hesse captures an impressive portrait of true crime with “American Fire: Love, Arson, and Life in a Vanishing Land.” It’s the story of a forgotten town in the aftermath of economic collapse and the couple responsible for torching more than 60 abandoned houses on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.

    Washington Post press reporter Monica Hesse catches a remarkable picture of real crime with “American Fire: Love, Arson, as well as Life in a Vanishing Land.” It’s the tale of a forgotten community in the aftermath of economic collapse and also the pair liable for torching greater than 60 deserted houses on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.

  • A compulsive overeater leaves West Virginia in an RV to search for his drug-addicted son in the novel “Eat Only When You’re Hungry” by Lindsay Hunter, author of the gritty novel “Ugly Girls.” A greasy road trip filled with humor, insatiable hunger and inevitable regret, which combine to create a nuanced depiction of working-class Americans and the obsessions that bind us all.

    An uncontrollable overeater leaves West Virginia in a Recreational Vehicle to look for his drug-addicted boy in the novel “Consume Only When You’re Hungry” by Lindsay Hunter, author of the abrasive story “Ugly Girls.” A greasy trip full of humor, pressing hunger and also unavoidable regret, which integrate to create a nuanced representation of working-class Americans and the fascinations that bind us all.

  • For a spine-tingling psychological horror story, look no further than Jac Jemc for a fresh take on the haunted house genre with “The Grip of It.” Channeling the best of Shirley Jackson, this creepy narrative is revealed in dual points of view, which is perfect for watching suspicions mount and young couple’s home life unravel.

    For a spine-tingling psychological horror story, look no better compared to Jac Jemc for a fresh take on the haunted house genre with “The Grip of It.” Carrying the best of Shirley Jackson, this weird narrative is exposed in double viewpoints, which is ideal for seeing uncertainties install and young pair’s residence life untangle.

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